Skip to Content Skip to Navigation

Dave Edwards and The Look/The Dave Edwards Band: Press

The Look of Love

Dave Edwards looks to the future with one eye on the past

Many of you who frequent shows and festivals around metro Detroit will be familiar with Danny D, the Rod Stewart tribute artist who both sounds and looks the part. D’s admiration and adoration for Stewart is always on display; he’s rarely seen in public without the full garb and he does his job well.

The Look’s Dave Edwards doesn’t do any of those things. However, it can be argued that Stewart’s spirit runs through Edwards’ veins (even if Stewart isn’t dead) — more so even than D’s.

Edwards has been fronting the Look since the late ’70s, adding a Detroit edge to the blues-based sleazy hard rock that the Faces did so gloriously, back before Rod got all insecure and asked us all if we think he’s “sexy.”

Edwards formed the Look in 1977 from the ashes of his first band, Tantrum, taking a cue from local heroes like the MC5.

“The Look did a few songs from the Tantrum era when I started the Look in ’77,” Edwards says. “When I was 15, the very first concert I saw in Pontiac was Bob Seger. It was the Bob Seger System — a power trio at that time — the MC5, the Stooges. I love punk music.”

Edwards might admire the attitude and energy of the punk movement, but that vibe, and certainly that aesthetic, isn’t apparent when you see his band live. His list of influences gives more away.

“In the early days, guys like Little Richard, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding — I listened to a lot of CKLW, a

radio station in Windsor,” Edwards explains. “They played black and white music together. The Beatles were a big influence, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Kinks. (I opened for the Kinks once.) People do compare me to Rod. I never consciously imitated him, but I do love Rod in his early days. When people say I look like Robert Plant and sound like Bryan Adams and Rod Stewart — I’ll take all of those.”

It’s easy to forget, but the Look was one of the first Detroit bands to be featured on MTV (back when the channel really spun videos 24 hours a day). The band had some national success and generated an almost-audible buzz for a while.

“I played with Peter Frampton once, and the girls were chasing us around like Beatles-mania,” Edwards says. “Even in the Tantrum days, people in the audience would claw at me. The Look and the Romantics were the first two Detroit bands on MTV, and the video thing really helped. We toured the United States because of that.”

The Look released four albums, scoring a chart hit with the song “We’re Gonna Rock,” then it all seemed to be over as quickly as it began.

“We signed with Fantasy Records on a five-record deal,” Edwards says. “They put keyboards on our

records, and they didn’t make videos. We became

disillusioned and it kind of just fell apart after that. Now we’ve learned how to record really well. I write a lot of songs. I think that there are only two kinds of music — good and bad … I’ve been working on my own stuff, which leaves little time.”

Nowadays, Edwards seems to alternate his time

between a reanimated Look, the Dave Edwards Band, and his reggae group the Belle Islanders. In truth, the Look and the Dave Edwards Band are one and the same. Only Edwards remains from the original Look group, but he will forever be associated with that band name.

“A lot of people associate me with the Look and I can’t shake it,” he says. “Paul Rodgers and Bad

Company — Paul’s tried to go solo but he can’t shake Bad Company. Roger Daltrey and the Who, Rod Stewart and the Faces; There’s really no difference, it’s like an ‘aka.’”

Edwards says he can’t shake the Look, but then again, why should he? “Everybody knows the tunes. People ask me if I ever get tired of singing ‘We’re Gonna Rock’ — absolutely not. At least I have two or three songs that people know and expect me to sing every night. I have no problem singing those songs.”

Speaking of his reggae band, they have a new album out. “My last rock album was recorded live, The Red Light is On,” Edwards says. “The record I’m promoting right now is by my reggae band, the Belle Islanders. That album’s called Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us. I think my rock band will be playing a couple of songs off of it too.

“I saw Bob Marley at the Masonic Temple. … in the late ’70s. I always liked reggae. … I always joked with my producer that we should have a reggae band called the Belle Islanders … and we used to laugh about it. … This is our second album. I’m really proud of this record.”

This Saturday, the Look plays Callahan’s in Auburn Hills, a venue that is fast becoming a haven for fans of classic rock and blues-rock.

“I have to do ‘We’re Gonna Rock,’” Edwards says. “It should be a really good, high energy, high-powered rock show. I love Callahan’s. This will be my fourth or fifth appearance there. We opened for the Hell Drivers, who later became the Rockets. I did a super session there. I love that place. I used to live in Auburn Hills — my parents had a house there.”

High-powered and high-energy is as good a description of the Look as any. They might not be grabbing the headlines or getting videos onto mainstream television anymore, but Edwards still has a voice like honey on sandpaper, the old songs still sound great and the new ones match them.

Who needs fucking MTV?

The Look plays Callahan’s on Saturday, Aug. 17,

with Chrome Mollie; 2105 South Blvd., Auburn Hills; 248-858-9508
Dave Edwards: the longtime Detroit rocker has a new album, " Pickin' Singles " out now on Hanzie Records. Edwards and his band " The Look " will perform Saturday 1/21/12 at The Rochester Mills Beer Co., in Rochester. The disc features six songs with guest appearances from Jimmie Bones ( Kid Rock, Howling Diablos ), Mitch Purdy ( Black Market ) and Larry LaBeck ( Orbitsuns ). Show at 10 p.m. Saturday, 400 Rochester Road, Rochester. 248-650-5080 For more:www.thelookde.net
Rachel May - Play - Detroit Free Press (Jan 19, 2012)
The Dave Edwards Band features, no surprises, Dave Edwards of The Look, best known for the MTV hit " We're Gonna Rock " .The Red Light Is On ... Live On WHFR ( Hanzie )sees the rocker recording an acoustic session for the aforementioned radio station, and he's in fine form. Oft thought of as our Rod Stewart, Edwards proves that he's well capable of kicking ass even when sitting down and strumming.
Brett Callwood - City Slang - Metro Times - Detroit, MI. (Jan 15, 2013)
RECONNAISANCE

Dave Edwards and The Look coming to Grand Rapids and Grand Haven in December

You may remember The Look’s muscular anthem “We’re Gonna Rock” or their follow-up hit “You Can’t Sit Down” from the 1980’s/ Rock radio and MTV were very kind to this Michigan group who were one of the very few acts to break out of its Midwest hometown and tour the country with those songs their calling card. Opening for the likes of Cheap Trick, John Mellencamp, The Kinks, Joe Cocker, Bob Seger and The Rockets (among many others). The Look developed a reputation for being an incredible live band – even winning encores while opening for The J. Geils Band at Pine Knob (now DTE). Today, the original band has moved on to other projects but lead singer Dave Edwards keeps the name and the fire alive with a band of seasoned pros who play with the same ferocity as The Look in its heyday. He also has put out three national solo records and is working on a fourth. Check out Edwards at the Eagles Club in Grand Haven (22 N. Second St.) on Dec. 3 or at 36th Street Lounge in Grand Rapids (945 36th Street SW) on Dec. 4, you can expect to hear not only the hits that The Look made popular but also favorites by Van Morrison, The Rolling Stones, Motown, Bob Seger, Rod Stewart and The Rockets. In other words, if you come to dance, you won’t sit down.
Reconnaisance - Recoil Magazine, Grand Rapids, MI...Vol. 10 Issue 12...Dec. 2010 (Dec, 2010)
Dave Edwards: Lone Survivor

Label: Look Right
Format: Album
Media: CD
Genre: Rock/Pop

By Brett Callwood

Does anybody remember the Look? Formed during the summer of '77, the Detroit rockers sat on the verge of major success for the better part of 15 years without ever getting the break that they perhaps deserved, touring with and opening for the likes of Bob Seger, Cheap Trick, John Cougar Mellencamp and J. Geils. Nowadays, the original version of the Look sits among such esteemed company as Frijid Pink, Früt of the Loom, the Third Power and the Up in a D-town category marked "not quite."

Dave Edwards was and is the leader of the Look, and the fiercely proud Detroiter is back with a solo record — his third — that's as impassioned and full of fire as it is necessary. If recent releases from Seger, the Stooges and Alice Cooper proved that Detroit's old-schoolers aren't content to simply rest on past glories, Lone Survivor is proof that old warriors like Edwards are not prepared to give up, even after a career riddled with setbacks.

If this album has a weakness, it's that Edwards has chosen to record so many cover versions; there are seven here, along with five originals. Still, those cover songs have been reinterpreted and given Edwards' simple but effective blues-rock stamp (Squeeze's "Tempted" and Leonard Cohen's "Ain't No Cure for Love" seem to work best) — and they sit comfortably alongside his own compositions. The opening "How Long" and "Good Time" are the highlights on a record bursting with quality, which is no surprise when considering the talent that Edwards roped in, including local legend Johnny "Bee" Badanjek (of Detroit Wheels, Alice Cooper and Howling Diablos) and Kid Rock's Twisted Brown Trucker man, Jimmy "Bones" Trombly.

Lone Survivor is the sound of a local veteran musician screaming out loud that he still has something to offer Detroit and the world. And who would deny him that?

Dave Edwards' next local gig is Friday, July 10, at Robusto's, 19271 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-881-0100.
Roseville-Eastpointe Eastsider (MI)

January 16, 2008


TAKE A CLOSER LOOK
Maria Allard C & G Staff Writer

Rock ‘n’ rollers who frequented local music clubs in the early 1980’s – including New York New York in Warren and the Main Act, which later became the Ritz in Roseville – will undoubtedly remember Dave Edwards and The Look.
The band made it all the way to MTV with its hit “We’re Gonna Rock,” a getoutta-your-chair diddy that made it impossible to find a spot on the dance floor because there was no room.

With his long blond mane, strapping guitar and raspy vocal chords, Edwards’ energy was as intense as the spandex fashions worn at the time. And although a few years have passed, Edwards is still at the top of his game.

A new incarnation of The Look has brought back the golden days of hip-shaking rock ‘n’ roll. Rockers are invited to check out the band when it performs Jan. 18-19 at Teddy’s Tavern in Warren. The shows, guaranteed to bring out the teenager in us all, begin at 9:30 p.m. Teddy’s Tavern is located at 7231 Chicago Road.

On stage is where Edwards, guitarists Bob Monteleone and Lou Abraham, drummer Rusty Russum and bassist Larry Banner feel right at home. This weekend they’ll entertain with Look material, including the hit “You Can’t Sit Down,” along with music from Edwards’ solo albums. His new CD “Lone Survivor” is scheduled for release in March.

Surviving the music business is something Edwards has accomplished. Playing live is amazing, the New Haven resident said, especially when the audience and band connect.

“I just have a lot of fun. I give everything I can,” said Edwards, a Pontiac native. “I’m always looking for a good time.”

Edwards wants the audience to do the same.

“There are so many problems in the world,” Edwards said. “If I can make people escape that for a couple hours, I’ve done my job.”

Teddy’s Tavern owner Dave Golder has known Edwards many years. When tavern staff recently bagan bringing in live entertainment, The Look was the first band Golder booked. Golder said the band’s first shows at the tavern “went real well.”

“Dave’s been around for years,” Golder said. “He’s sort of an icon of the local sceen.”

The Look formed in 1977. After paying its dues, the band found its niche. With amps cranked, The Look toured the country, playing shows with Cheap Trick, Joe Cocker and John Cougar Mellencamp. Edwards and guitarist Ted Nugent, also known for his political views, even crossed paths once at a show. The Look also played shows with the Romantics, another band from Detroit that hit in the 1980s.

According to Edwards, The Look was the first Detroit band to be featured on MTV when it was still getting off the ground. Edwards remembers hanging out with the veejays Martha Quinn, Alan Hunter and the late J.J. Jackson. The Look also has its own look.

“We looked like a new wave band but we sounded like heavy metal or classic rock. We tried to do power-pop. It was heavier than that,” Edwards said. “It’s great to be known for one or two songs. Music is timeless.”

Dave Edwards and The Look also will perform Jan. 26 at Robusto’s at 19271 Mack Ave., in Grosse Pointe Woods. Show time is 9:30 p.m.

You can reach Staff Writer Maria Allard at allard@candgnews.com or (586) 498-1045.
Maria Allard C & G Staff Writer - C & G News
CD REVIEW
Take Another Look and Second Look Vol. 1


Well here is a stranger from the past. Detroit’s DAVE EDWARDS has been around for many years and die-hards will remember an obscure band from the late 70's called THE LOOK who released a few albums. The Look toured with everyone from Cheap Trick to John Cougar Mellencamp and released three albums before breaking up in the mid eighties, reforming in the 90's for a fourth album and releasing several solo albums has kept Dave busy over the years.

Dave all the years later is still out there and releasing product and was kind enough to send me some new material to preview. Namely his current releases 'Take Another Look' released back in 2006 and his latest mini CD 'Second Look Vol.1' which sees Dave joined by band members Bob Monteleone, Lou Abraham and Rusty Russum.

'Second Look' contains four tracks like the slamming Bob Segar, John Cougar Mellencamp influenced 'I Can't Quit You', and this is great rocking track even hinting at Bryan Adams, especially vocally. I loved the slide guitar tone and whole vibe of the song which should by rights be on radio, good time rock n' roll. Next up is 'Real At The Time' and right away this gets the old feet tapping along to its gritty guitar shell. Once again this is more of the above and just smokes, strong guitars and vocals.

'Soul Deep' (featuring Shaun Murphy from Little Feat) has a country pop feel without loosing the rock n' roll vibe. Once again this could be a Bryan Adams tune and is just great, kinda Bryan Adams meets Sheryl Crow and Melissa Etheridge and a fun live version of 'I Need You' from 'Take Another Look'. Overall I really enjoyed this mini album the songs are strong, well produced and fun.

Moving onto the previously released 'Take Another Look' I found myself greeted with more fantastic songs that mix pop/rock blues and Rn'B covers with original material and makes for a right old fun time. The Small Faces cover 'What 'Cha Gonna Do About It' and 'Jenny In A Silhouette' set the mood for the album. The former is boogie blues pop rock straight from the house of Albert King whilst the latter is catchy pop/rock reminding me of George Harrison and Los Labos.

Then the album goes one step better with the albums big cut, which is the cover of Delbert McClinton's 'Giving It Up For Your Love'. This is awesome and reminds of the Flesh and Blood record that featured Tyketto's Danny Vaughn on vocals crossed with a mix of Bob Segar. The song is immense, full of soul n' blues licks and by rights should be massive, hugely enjoyable and very catchy, Dave sounds awesome and the Hammond organ and bass line feeds the song vibe nicely.

The ballad 'Let's Make Love' is gorgeous, again it's hard not to compare this music to Bryan Adams, the music is that strong. Dave's version of Glenn Frey's 'I Found Somebody' is Bryan Adams with a touch of Steve Perry style pop/rock with a country edge, the vocals are great and the whole song is very catchy. The cover of 'Everything That You Do (Will Come Back To You) is smooth and slick Rn'B with cool bass playing from Bob Monteleone. Next is the cover of Roger Chapman's 'Burlesque', this gets the album back to the blues’ rockin' and smokes, strong guitar vibe dominates this song coupled with catchy lyrics and chorus, live this would be a lot of fun. Graham Parker's 'Soul Shoes' has a more distorted guitar vibe, and reminds me of John Cougar Mellencamp and Bob Segar and is very catchy.

'Give Me One Reason' is a cool cover of the Tracy Chapman ditty whilst 'Loosen Up' is another catchy pop/rocker that you can't help but singalong to, some very nice guitar work going down and again it's amazing how close vocally Dave is to Bryan Adams. Bryan should enlist Dave to write songs for him, Dave could get Bryan back to his rocking best.

'I Need You' is smooth and sexy, blues pop rock. Once again the vocals have a smoking feel, they style that makes me think of Steve Perry when he starts getting into his Sam Cooke vein, this track was originally written by Paul Carrack and also recorded by Nick Lowe and is a good version. 'No Other Baby' ends the album in a happy but subtle country pop flavoured mood, the track has a real country bar room swagger feel and has also been recorded by Paul McCarntey. Bobby Helms originally recorded it in the 50's.

Over all Dave proves he still has got what it takes, the records work on every level and the production by Bob Monteleone is top class, and as cover albums goes, this is the one with the kick in it's tale as is well worth buying. I love it and I had a lot of fun with this album. www.myspace.com/thelookfeaturingdaveedwards & www.thelook.net
Fireworks Magazine UK (Feb 12, 2008)
"Dave Edward's voice sounds like a white Wilson Pickett ripping through some great soul remakes."
Detroit News
"Dave Edwards is a deft vocal stylist who can even evoke comparisons to The Four Tops', Levi Stubbs."
Ted Shaw - The Windsor Ontario, Canada Star
"Lead singer Dave Edwards adds vocals that have the raspy, hungry sound of Rod Stewart, pre-Hollywood."
Carl Arrington - People Magazine
"Not since Bob Seger and The Silver Bullet Band has Detroit produced a group as influential as "The Look". The Look has been together a long time and to say they have been overlooked is an understatement. It's obvious the band has it's own unique sound".
Morris Messre - Record Reviews University Of South Carolina
"We're Gonna Rock" - The Look - Although new British bands have been getting most of the media play, the American heartland is still producing tough, traditional rock units.This Detroit-based band has been getting lots of regional airplay on it's debut indie release. Their straight-ahead sound is delivered with raspy three and four-part harmonies and a young outlook. Top tracks are "We're Gonna Rock".
Variety
"There is a certain good-time, staight ahead rock-n-roll, best exemplified by the J. Geils Band, that has a timeless quality of its own and which becomes a standard by which other bands can be judged. "The Look" has that quality, while staying true to its original driving spirit."
Billboard Magazine
"The Look - musicians totally dedicated to the art of music."
Mitch Ryder
From The Metro Times 25th Anniversary Issue: Oct. 2005
"Where the hell are they now?"

The Look

Keyboards slay early MTV power-pop faves

Who: Dave Edwards, vocals; Sam Warren, guitar; Randy Volin, guitar; Rich Cochran, bass; John Sarkisian, drums.

What: Motor City hard rock cloaked in pop, mining a Pretty Things, Cheap Trick, Detective and Sonic’s Rendezvous Band mother lode.


The Look was the first Detroit band on MTV with its “We’re Gonna Rock” clip in 1981. MTV rotated the band’s 1982 follow-up video of the single, “You Can’t Sit Down,” a cover of the Dovells R&B-dance hit. The song made American Bandstand’s “rate-a-record” that year, netting a better-than-respectable score of 94. The Look got much FM love in days when Detroit radio wasn’t so afraid of local music. All this for a band on a tiny Detroit indie. (In Canada, it had a major Canadian record deal with A&M.) “We were getting massive airplay, but you couldn’t find our records,” says band songwriter Dave Edwards.



In 1983, The Look signed with Fantasy Records (and Fantasy/A&M in Europe), the house that Creedence Clearwater Revival built.



Where: The Roostertail, Harpo’s, Center Stage, the Music Box, and Cobo Hall with the Romantics, Rhythm Corps, Adrenaline, Toby Red, Strut, Bittersweet Alley (“a huge girl band,” Edwards says) and others. It did a five-night stand supporting the J. Geils Band at Pine Knob, and extensively toured the United States and Canada.



When: Officially began in 1977, when four-sets-a-night, five-nights-a-week cover bands roamed the suburbs. Hit a stride in 1980 and split in 1985.



What Happened: With the MTV exposure, Fantasy Records bet on The Look to be the new Creedence. But the in-house producer, Phil Kaffel, diluted the band’s “Detroit guitar rock” with silly keyboards, and fans and radio stayed away. The record was the band’s death knell. “That and inexperienced management,” Edwards says. We toured behind the LP, but the original drummer quit in 1984. Fantasy wouldn’t do videos and dropped the band.”



Where They Are Now: The original members all live in metro Detroit. Sarkisian is a mortgage broker, Warren is a computer programmer, and Cochran is retired with a medical disability. Volin does solo records and showcases as Randy Volin and the Sonic Blues. Edwards continues to lead a version of The Look, with a pair of albums recorded in recent years. His first solo album, Take Another Look, came out last year on the local Scorpion/Hanzie label.
Brian Smith - Metro Times (Oct 19, 2005)